History of the Airbrush pt 2

Charles Burdick Aerograph Airbrush www.getpainted.com

Pre-School Part 3:
History of the Airbrush cont…

1891-1893 – The reign of the Liberty Walkup external mix airbrush comes to an end when Charles L. Burdick from Chicago invents the internal mix airbrush. This new airbrush had several unique features and more closely resembled the airbrushes of today with a centralized fluid tip, needle, and air cap. It was sleeker, more refined and produced an atomized spray that was softer and more controllable than current external mix airbrushes. In your face Walkup!

The Burdick airbrushes were dubbed Aerographs, and the process of painting with one was called aerographing instead of airbrushing. The first Aerograph was labeled the Model A, it featured a dual action trigger and interchangeable paint tips. Apparently when you upgrade something that already exists, you can call it whatever you want to. Which is why I’ve taken a standard airbrush and welded a samurai sword to it. I call it a Samurair Sword.

Thayer and Chandler Airbrush by Olaus Wold www.getpainted.com

1893 – Norwegian Henry Thayer, and Englishman Charles Chandler’s new and improved internal mix airbrush makes it’s debut at the Columbian Exposition World’s Fair. The new, new internal mix airbrush was easier to use, simpler to maintain and it gave better results with less training. About 4 years later, thanks to a guy named Olaus Wold, who was working with Thayer and Chandler at the time, a breakthrough airbrush design is created where the paint is isolated from the trigger assembly. This made it much easier to switch colors and to clean.

1904 – Jens Andreas Paasche from Norway starts Paasche Airbrush Company.  Offering “The most complete line of Airpainting equipment for Art Studios, Factories and Maser Painters” Paasche continues to refine and improve upon current designs, securing several patents of his own. Notable airbrushes include the iconic red handled Paasche VL Series  (one of the most used airbrushes in the industry) the Paasche AB-Turbo with it’s unique turbine system and more recently the Paasche Talon.

1926 – Iwata Seisakusho company is established. Initially started with manufacture and sales of spray guns and small-sized air compressors in Japan. Credited with developing the world’s first electric, multi-articulated painting robot together with Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd. Started manufacture and sales of Airbrushes in 1973. Changed the name to Anest Iwata some years later.

Famous for their Eclipse and Micron line of airbrushes.

1964 – Badger Airbrush Company is born. The founder’s grandfather owned a swiss screw machine shop that was making parts for three airbrush companies (Paasche, Thayer & Chandler, and Wold).

Teflon seals, free standing color cups, and one piece triggers were the first notable advances as well as doing a left handed side feed gun. Badger was also the first to offer different airbrush models with interchangeable parts to help dealers and consumers reduce spare parts needs, two piece break away handles, easy needle access, stainless tips, the first airbrush ready paint, the first airbrush holder, the Universal dual feed airbrush.

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